Category: ‘Press Releases’

Ski and Snowboarding Season is Around the Corner: Train Now for a Healthy Season

Posted in Press Releases | September 29, 2017

Dr. Kevin Plancher with Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine explains common ski and snowboarding injuries and tips to help prevent them

New York, NY and Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) September 29, 2017

Colorful leaves falling from the trees means only one thing to die-hard skiers and snowboarders: the snow season isn’t far behind. Most people don’t realize this but training early is imperative for a healthy, injury-free ski season, says orthopaedic surgeon Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. (more…)


Tips for an Injury-Free Soccer Season

Posted in Press Releases | September 20, 2017

Dr. Kevin Plancher with Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine explains common high school soccer injuries and offers tips to avoid them

New York, NY and Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) September 20, 2017

September 2017 – A new school year means soccer season is well underway, with nearly a million American high school girls and boys participating in the world’s most popular sport. But all of them – and especially girls, who are prone to season ending knee ACL tears – should take steps to prevent common injuries that can cut into their time on the field, according to orthopaedic surgeon Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. (more…)


Treatment Options for Kneecap Problems

Posted in General Orthopaedics, Press Releases | August 30, 2017

Dr. Kevin Plancher with Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine explains conditions affecting the kneecap and offers tips on how they’re treated

New York, NY and Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) August 30, 2017

It’s safe to say that most of us don’t notice our kneecaps – known medically as the patella – unless one of them hurts. But a surprising number of conditions can cause pain around the kneecap, the vast majority of which successfully resolve with non-operative treatment, according to orthopaedic surgeon Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. (more…)


With Tennis Season in Full Swing, Can Tennis Elbow Be Far Behind?

Posted in General Orthopaedics, Press Releases | August 24, 2017

Dr. Kevin Plancher with Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine explains how tennis elbow is diagnosed and offers tips on treatment

New York, NY and Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) August 24, 2017

With warm temperatures spanning from summer through fall, tennis season is still in full swing – and cases of tennis elbow are becoming more apparent in those affected by this common type of elbow pain, according to orthopaedic surgeon Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine.

The term “tennis elbow” came into use since the condition poses a significant problem for some tennis players, but the truth is that fewer than 5% of tennis elbow diagnoses are actually related to playing the popular racquet sport, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Known medically as lateral epicondylitis, tennis elbow disproportionately affects men between ages 30 and 50 and those whose sports or activities require repetitive elbow, wrist and arm movement, including golfers, bowlers, baseball players, house cleaners, painters, carpenters and others.

“The pain from tennis elbow is caused by tearing in the area of muscle and tendon around the bony outer part of the elbow,” Dr. Plancher explains. “The tearing can happen slowly or abruptly, but typically feels worse when squeezing objects – like the handle of a tennis racquet – or moving the wrist with force, such as opening a jar or using a tool.”

How is tennis elbow diagnosed?
Doctors often suspect tennis elbow as soon as patients describe its hallmark pain or burning symptoms on the outer part of their elbow or their weak grip strength. But several factors are considered when making a formal diagnosis, including the type of work you do and sports you play.

A doctor will often test a patient’s ability to straighten the wrist and fingers against resistance, with the arm held fully straight, to determine if this causes pain. “If it does, that’s a strong clue those muscles aren’t healthy,” Dr. Plancher says. “A proper diagnosis is important, since many conditions can cause pain around the elbow.”

Additional diagnostic tests may be used to pinpoint tennis elbow. They include:

X-rays, which best illuminate hard structures such as bone and can rule out arthritis in the elbow.

MRI scans, which best highlight soft tissues and can rule out a herniated disc or arthritis in the neck as the cause of refined elbow pain.

EMG (electromyography), which can rule out nerve compression in the nerves traveling to the elbow.

Tennis elbow treatments extensive, varied
In the vast majority of cases, tennis elbow symptoms fade away within a matter of months. But an extensive list of treatments can help cut pain and inflammation in the affected elbow and/or decrease further stress on the joint.

According to Dr. Plancher, a Clinical Professor in Orthopaedics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, conservative tennis elbow treatments include:

Rest: Avoid any activity that causes pain to the elbow for several weeks.

Ice: Apply ice to the affected area several times each day for 20-minute periods.

NSAIDs: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can lower pain and inflammation.

Steroid injections: Your doctor can inject cortisone into the affected area once if there is a crisis. Topical steroid creams can be administered to the elbow surface.

Splint: Sometimes doctors will prescribe a splint made by an OTR, CHT to stabilize and protect the injured elbow.

Equipment check: Those whose tennis elbow stems from playing a racquet sport may want to check their equipment for proper fit. Racquets that are stiffer or looser-strung can lower stress on the forearm, or a smaller racquet head may help prevent recurring symptoms.

PRP injections: Platelet-rich plasma, which is derived from a patient’s own blood, can be injected into the affected elbow area. PRP is a promising newer non-surgical tennis elbow treatment and contains high concentrations of growth factor proteins that can speed healing with or without stem cells.

For chronic cases of tennis elbow that don’t respond to conservative treatments – which is unusual (less than 5%) – surgery is an option to repair the elbow’s injured muscle and tendon area. Most surgeries, whether open or minimally invasive, involve removing diseased muscle from the elbow and re-attaching healthy muscle to bone. Additionally, a newer surgical technique called the Tenex procedure, percutaneous tenotomy, utilizes new technology and requires only a tiny incision to insert a tissue removal device that breaks down scar tissue inside the elbow using ultrasonic energy.

“With so many treatment options, no one needs to cope with tennis elbow without relief,” Dr. Plancher says. “Whether you’re a tennis player or not, this condition hopefully won’t stop you for long.”

Kevin D. Plancher, MD, is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon and the founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine.

Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine is a comprehensive orthopaedics and sports medicine practice with offices in New York City and Greenwich, CT. http://www.plancherortho.com


ACL Injuries on the Rise in Young Female Athletes

Posted in General Orthopaedics, Press Releases, Sports Injuries, Sports Injury | August 9, 2017

Dr. Kevin Plancher with Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine explains reasons behind trend and offers tips on ACL injury diagnosis and treatment

New York, NY and Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) August 09, 2017

August 2017 –ACL injuries are common injury overall; however, young female athletes are far more likely than males to suffer a sprain or tear to their anterior cruciate ligament, which is vital to the knee’s stability, according to orthopaedic surgeon Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. (more…)


Achilles Tendinosis: How It Happens and How It’s Treated

Posted in Blog, Press Releases, Sports Injuries | July 31, 2017

Dr. Kevin Plancher with Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine explains causes, diagnosis and offers tips on treatment of injury to body’s largest tendon.

New York, NY and Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) July 31, 2017

The Achilles tendon is the largest, strongest tendon in the body. Few pay attention to this tendon and muscle it until it becomes inflamed – causing pain and tightness – in a condition known as Achilles tendinosis, according to orthopaedic surgeon Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. (more…)


Avoid Injury by Lifting Weights Safely

Posted in Fitness, Press Releases, Sports Injury | July 11, 2017

Dr. Kevin Plancher with Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine offers tips on weight training safely to avoid injury.

New York, NY and Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) July 11, 2017

You want to be stronger – and heard about weight training’s many benefits. But if you’re also worried that lifting weights will lead to injury, you’re not alone. Fortunately, there are many ways to avoid getting hurt while taking advantage of this timeless fitness trend, according to sports medicine specialist Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine.

“It’s now conventional wisdom that weight training isn’t only for those seeking eye-popping arm muscles or rip-roaring abs. Indeed, lifting weights has become a popular part of fitness regimens for adults of all ages, helping to burn calories and improve heart health and balance on top of toning muscles and strengthening bones,” says Dr. Plancher, who lectures globally on issues related to orthopaedic procedures and sports injury management.

There’s no question that lifting weights can be risky, causing more than 49,000 injuries each year among Americans, according to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, which collects data on injuries requiring hospital emergency room visits.

“Unfortunately, many people try weight training without understanding how to avoid hurting themselves,” Dr. Plancher explains. “These risks go way down when we educate ourselves about these factors and preventive techniques. There are many benefits of weight lifting, the downsides are few, and it just takes a little forethought to make the most of this fitness option.”

Potential weight-lifting risks

Sometimes a weight-lifting injury announces itself loudly, with a popping sound, sensation, or a rush of pain. Other weight training injuries seem to come on slowly. Dr. Plancher says there are two main types of common strength-training injuries:

Traumatic: “These injuries happen suddenly and you know it immediately,” he says. “The popping or pain sensation is searing, unmistakable, and you can’t ignore it.” Traumatic injuries from weight lifting may require a trip to the emergency room and other acute measures to treat.

Overuse: Also attributable to aging, overuse injuries related to weight lifting occur slowly, with cartilage, muscles, tendons and ligaments wearing down and becoming less flexible. Overtraining and other mistakes, such as not staying hydrated, can also contribute to these weight-training injuries, Dr. Plancher says.

Certain body areas – including the back, knees, shoulders, elbows and wrists – are particularly vulnerable in the weight room, he notes.

“These areas are repetitively stressed by motions used in weight lifting, so when combined with mistakes such as poor technique or lifting too much, they typically suffer the worst harm,” adds Dr. Plancher, also a Clinical Professor in Orthopaedics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.

Injury prevention tips

If you want to stay in the weight room but stay out of the doctor’s office, Dr. Plancher offers these tried-and-true methods for preventing weight lifting-related injuries:

Use proper form: You may not even know you’re lifting wrong, but this can make all the difference in how your body responds. “There are several ways to make sure you’re practicing proper form. You can ask an orthopedic sports medicine physician to teach you correct lifting techniques,” he says. “Or with a professional guiding you, use the mirrors on the gym walls to check your form, paying close attention to the placement of your knees, ankles and hands during reps such as squats or bench presses.”

Warm up right: Ideally, your fitness routine will incorporate light cardio, stretching and low resistance exercises before you even pick up a dumbbell. “Your core temperature and muscle flexibility will increase just enough to help your weight lifting be safer – and more effective,” he says.

Get a spotter: When lifting free weights, it’s always safest to have a spotter to avoid injury.

Skip the danger: Avoid “tough-guy” moves that you and your high school friends may have done in the weight room when you were much younger, such as Olympic bench presses or deadlifts. These don’t make sense for most amateur athletes and pose the most risks, Dr. Plancher says.

“A weight-lifting injury is much more likely to occur when you have poor form, execute dangerous moves or don’t take the time to warm up properly,” he says. “Use your common sense and ask for help when in doubt. This will help keep your strength-training regimen robust.”

Kevin D. Plancher, MD, is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon and the founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine.

Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine is a comprehensive orthopaedics and sports medicine practice with offices in New York City and Greenwich, CT. http://www.plancherortho.com


5 Key Tips for Understanding ACL Reconstruction

Posted in Knee Replacement Surgery, Press Releases, Sports Injury | June 21, 2017

Dr. Kevin Plancher with Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine highlights important points about torn anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

New York, NY & Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) June 21, 2017

June 2017 – “It is highly likely you know someone who’s torn their ACL (anterior cruciate ligament), one of the four main ligaments in the knee and a ligament that’s vital to the knee’s stability and normal movement. But for many people, ACL reconstruction surgery is a hazier concept requiring more understanding,” according to orthopaedic surgeon Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. (more…)


Robotic Knee Replacement Offers Key Advantages

Posted in Blog, Press Releases | June 15, 2017

Dr. Kevin Plancher with Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine with tips on robotic knee surgery using Stryker technology

New York, NY and Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) June 15, 2017

With knee replacement surgeries becoming increasingly popular among active adults whose joints have been damaged by osteoarthritis comes a parallel surge in robotic-assisted surgeries, which are proving to be more precise and usually offer a quicker recovery, according orthopaedic surgeon Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine.

Nearly 700,000 people ages 45 and up undergo knee replacement surgery each year, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. These surgeries are primarily used to treat those whose knee joints have degenerated due to osteoarthritis, the surgery – whether a partial or total joint replacement – can be done in two ways: conventionally, which relies on the surgeon’s visual assessment of the knee and direct manipulation; or robotically, which uses CT imaging and a robotic arm to assist the surgeon with precise measurements.

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration has approved three robotic systems for knee replacement. Stryker Orthopaedics, a global leader in medical technology that manufactures prosthetic knee joints, acquired Mako Surgical Corp. in 2013. The Stryker/Mako system has used their robotic arm-assisted surgery for more than 50,000 partial knee replacements, according to 2016 research in the American Journal of Orthopaedics.

“The Stryker/Mako robotic system is a great example of how technology is transforming how knee replacement surgeries are done,” Dr. Plancher says. “I’m excited to be able to offer my patients this cutting-edge option to help them resume their active lives hopefully without chronic pain as soon as possible.”

How is robotic knee replacement performed?
Patients tend to have many questions about how robotic surgery is performed, Dr. Plancher notes. The most common question asked is if a robot is performing the patient’s surgery. The resounding answer to that is no. Despite the name, a human surgeon is very much in charge of the procedure. So, how is robotic knee replacement carried out? Dr. Plancher describes the steps:

  1. First, a CT scan, which is a type of special x-ray, of the patient’s knee is used to generate a 3-D virtual model of their specific anatomy. This model is loaded into the Stryker/Mako software and the surgeon uses it to personalize the surgical plan.
    2. In the operating room itself, the surgeon uses the robotic arm to assist the surgery, guiding it within the precise boundaries defined by the surgical plan. The robotic surgical tools resurface the damaged part of the knee.
    3. The robotic system allows the surgeon to make changes as needed based on what is visualized inside the knee.
    4. The surgeon places metal components on the ends of the thighbone and tibia bone (below the kneecap), cementing them in place. A plastic insert is then placed between the metal components to enable smooth knee movement.

“We’re simply taking advantage of technology to assist us in resurfacing the bones and individualize treatment to a patient’s own knee anatomy,” explains Dr. Plancher, also a Clinical Professor in Orthopaedics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.

“Robotic surgery helps to tightly control factors such as lower leg alignment, soft tissue balance and other variables that all contribute to how successful the surgery is overall,” says Dr. Plancher, who lectures globally on issues related to orthopaedic procedures and sports injury management. “Research is making an attempt to improve accuracy through robotic assisted knee replacement in the hope of improving the longevity of the prosthesis.”

Kevin D. Plancher, MD, is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon and the founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine.

Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine is a comprehensive orthopaedics and sports medicine practice with offices in New York City and Greenwich, CT. http://www.plancherortho.com


Cutting-Edge FloGraft Can Alleviate Knee Pain

Posted in Press Releases | May 16, 2017

Dr. Kevin Plancher with Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine Offers tips on new treatment option for arthritis of the knee

New York, NY & Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) May 16, 2017

Instead of putting up with nagging pain and stiffness and continually taking anti-inflammatory medications, wouldn’t it be better to help those with knee arthritis to actually heal? That’s the premise behind a newer injectable therapy called FloGraft, which uses human amniotic fluid to protect and regenerate inflamed knee joints, says orthopaedic surgeon Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine.

FloGraft is one of several bio-derived substances orthopaedists and sports medicine doctors have been using in recent years as part of a “regenerative medicine” effort. This cutting-edge treatment makes use of amniotic fluid, which cushions and protects babies during pregnancy and is harvested during cesarean births without harming mother or baby, Dr. Plancher explains.

The injectable treatment adds another alternative for a nonsurgical treatment for osteoarthritis, which is one of the most common health problems in the United States. Arthritis of the knee affects about 10% of men and 13% of women over age 60 nationwide, according to the National Institutes of Health. Often called wear-and-tear arthritis, the pain, stiffness, decreased range of motion and swelling it causes not only makes it hard to move around easily, but takes away some of the enjoyment of life for those affected.

“Beyond undergoing total knee replacement surgery, which is obviously an invasive procedure, doctors haven’t had that many options to offer knee arthritis patients in the past,” says Dr. Plancher, also a Clinical Professor in Orthopaedics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. “The development of FloGraft is definitely a promising and welcoming alternative along with other newer modalities.”

How FloGraft works
How does FloGraft work? It helps to understand that amniotic fluid, and the membrane surrounding it, are diverse substances containing many components, including the structural protein collagen, growth factors, and anti-inflammatory proteins. When injected into the knee, these all work together to ease the bone-on-bone grinding from thinning cartilage often occurring in knee arthritis. Furthermore, this potentially promotes regeneration of the cartilage and other tissues that have been worn away.

Injections of amniotic fluid and membrane tissue are being analyzed not just for knee arthritis, but other orthopaedic conditions as well, Dr. Plancher notes. These include tendonitis, muscle tears, cartilage repair, and even plantar fasciitis in the foot. And while FloGraft itself is a relatively new product, using human- and bovine-derived amniotic fluid to treat orthopaedic conditions was reported as long ago as 1927, Dr. Plancher says.

Before being used on patients, harvested amniotic fluid is screened extensively for safety. Donors also undergo a variety of blood tests and medical reviews to determine if their material is safe to use on others.

“The great thing is that amniotic fluid is a readily available substance,” he says, “and having something like this that’s easily injected into damaged body areas opens the possibility of regenerative medicine for a wide variety of disorders and injuries.”

What to expect with FloGraft treatment
What can you expect if you undergo FloGraft treatment? The injection process takes just a few minutes and only poses minimal discomfort, Dr. Plancher explains. Patients can leave the office immediately and go about their daily activities with exception of using crutches for a short period of time if injected into the knee. The number of FloGraft injections needed for each patient will vary and is tailored to their individual situation.

“Hopefully once it’s injected into the knee, FloGraft will help the knee begin healing within weeks, and patients should notice a real difference in their arthritis symptoms within a few months,” says Dr. Plancher, who lectures globally on issues related to orthopaedic procedures and sports injury management. “Many patients notice less pain after only one injection.”

Kevin D. Plancher, MD, is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon and the founder of Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine.

Plancher Orthopaedics & Sports Medicineis a comprehensive orthopaedics and sports medicine practice with offices in New York City and Greenwich, CT. http://www.plancherortho.com